New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
Public contact: (505) 476-8000
dan.williams@state.nm.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, JUNE 23, 2010:

NEW MEXICO OHV RIDERS REMINDED TO BE SAFE, LEGAL THIS SUMMER
DEPARTMENT INSPECTING BOATS FOR AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES



NEW MEXICO OHV RIDERS REMINDED TO BE SAFE, LEGAL THIS SUMMER

Summer vacation season is upon us, and for many that means it's time to take the off-highway vehicle for a spin in New Mexico's back country. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is urging all OHV riders to be safe and comply with the state's OHV laws.

By following some simple rules, OHV riders can have a pleasant, citation-free experience:

  • Always wear a helmet and eye protection; it is a requirement for anyone younger than 18, and a good practice for riders of any age.
  • All OHVs used on public lands must be registered with New Mexico or have a nonresident permit.
  • Be considerate of others you encounter on the trail and respect private property.
  • Stay on designated trails and never pursue or harass wildlife or livestock.
  • Always leave the area better than you found it.

 
Before you start your weekend, take a moment to familiarize yourself with New Mexico’s OHV requirements at www.B4uRide.com, or call the New Mexico Off-Highway Vehicle Program at (505) 476-8171.

New Mexico offers unique opportunities for off-highway vehicle recreation, and as trails and recreation areas become more crowded, it’s important for all people to operate their OHV safely and responsibly. Department of Game and Fish conservation officers and other law enforcement officers will be checking OHV riders statewide for registration, permits and required safety equipment.


DEPARTMENT INSPECTING BOATS FOR AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES

Conservation officers with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish will inspect boats and related equipment for Aquatic Invasive Species at popular reservoirs during the 2010 boating season. Officers will establish check stations to contact boaters and ensure that vessels and gear are free of invasive species.
  
Aquatic Invasive Species include zebra and quagga mussels, which occur in water bodies in states adjacent to New Mexico. There are not yet any infested waters in New Mexico, but the organisms are carried from place to place on boat trailers and boats. They attach to hard surfaces and can live out of water for weeks at a time. The mussels reproduce rapidly, causing irreversible environmental damage. They can seriously damage boat engines by clogging engine cooling systems, and they can cause extensive damage by clogging water delivery systems. The costs of dealing with an infested water body can be significant.

To stop aquatic hitchhikers, the best safety practice is: “Clean, drain, dry, every time.”

For information about aquatic invasive species, please visit: www.wildlife.state.nm.us. Click on the "Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers" stop sign graphic under "Issues and Answers."

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Tune in to New Mexico Game and Fish TV:
“New Mexico Wildlife”       6:30 a.m. Saturdays on KASA Channel 2, Albuquerque
                                          6:30 p.m. Sundays on KENW, Portales
                                          7:30 p.m. Thursdays on KRWG, Las Cruces

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